Translation and Localization in Brazil

Hi!

Talking about Localization, we saw that this is the process of  the language adaptation, appearance, and functionality of a product to the public in a specific country. There are many things to take care of and this professional has to be aware of the culture and more.

Deeper into this subject, we have the Brazilian Portuguese Localization. No different from what I said before, but aiming the Brazilian public. Our biggest problem here, and the complains of many people that I talk to, are the movies. Dubbed movies are, most of the time, horrible to watch and make a lot of ears bleed if you know how to speak English. Of course not all the Brazilians can learn English – or another language – and watch the movie with the original sound, but, if they only knew what happens, they may agree with me.

Well, one example is the translation of movie titles. Let work with a really nice movie that I liked a lot because of the sound tracks – Tenacious D and the Pick of Destiny. In Portuguese, the translation of that is “Tenacious D – Uma Dupla Infernal” (In Portugal is it call – Rock dos Infernos – En: Rock from Hell). So, let supposed that the movie was released in Brazil and we had to translate to English. The name would be “Tenacious D – An Infernal Double” or “An Infernal Couple”, something like that. Wouldn’t that sound pretty weird?

Now, assuming that the movie is about 2 guys that are looking for a magic guitar pic, why wouldn’t translate the title to “Tenacious D – A palheta do Destino” (Original English name: Tenacious D and the Pick of Destiny).

Well, that’s because that wouldn’t be so good as “Uma dupla Infernal”. If you research and check the movies here in Brazil, most of it has really different names and that is because of Localization.

I started to understand why they give such names to the movies that would sound so good also in Portuguese. Brazilian people are not used to these kinds of names and, to reach most of the population, they have to call that. According to the online newspaper ultimosegundo.ig.com.br, only 2% of the Brazilian population knows how to speak fluent English. Then imagine you releasing a movie here In Brazil with the original title. And more, most of the Brazilian people are not used to the kind of music that is played on the movie. Hard/Heavy music are some styles really hard to get into the Brazilian culture. So, that’s why – and for other reasons – that they had to change the name.

I have to say that really makes me feel bad, because, when talking about music, it is a pretty good movie, but I have to agree that it wouldn’t reach so many people with the original title translated.

There is where we come with the localization. Not only on the movies, but in games. If you do not do a really good job, not only translating but localizing, something in the game will be out of tune for the Brazilian public and it make take you game – which can be amazing – to a disaster just because you didn’t do a good job.

Another think about it is how you translate and how you localize a specific game to a specific public. But I will try to talk about that in another post.

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Part II – Tips for a Good Translation

Hi.

There I am again with second part of the Tips for a good translation. Once more, these are information that I found over the internet and if you want to check the real source, please IT IS ON THE POST. Read all of it. If after reading once, you couldn’t find the source, READ IT AGAIN! Then if you couldn’t, again, find the source, make sure that you really could find it and send me and e-mail that I will personally (as being the only one working on the blog right now) include it. J

Source of the text: http://www.terminologia.com.br/2011/09/dicas-ao-aspirante-a-tradutor/ (Yo, you found it!!!!)

Translation and adaptation to English: Blog’s Author. Enjoy the reading!

1 – Do the right thing. To understand a pair of languages is indispensable, but NOT enough. All the languages have its own particularities, idiomatic expressions, etc. e.g. a good translator is not the one that translates everything word by word, but the ones that knows how to understand the info and express it correctly on the target idiom;

2 –Research A LOT. Search about the text and work you are doing, so you can understand of what you are writing about. Invest as long as it necessary, because that will give you more confidence and agility when working;

3 – NEVER GUESS. When you get to a point where you have to translate something that has many meanings, make a “cross comparison” of the term’s definition on the main language and target language. Compare them until you find a better translation that fits on your work;

4 – Update yourself. Get into Forums about translation. It is a good way to count with others experience and still be updated with what is going on in the market.

5 – Use, but do not abused the internet. Search engines, as Google, are really helpful when talking about translations. But never trust on the “superficial look” or, “just a quick look” to check something. Go after many sources before deciding to use a term. It doesn’t matter that a term back with 1 million accesses of views, it still can be wrong.

6 – Lear how use a computer. This is your main object of work. Do not stay just on writing texts and using Word. Get into the internet, write e-mails, connect yourself, discover. There are a lot of information (useful ones) if you know where to look and how to do a search;

7 – Be ethical and professional. Read all the text and analyses before accepting the job. Calculate how long you will take to research about the subject, translate and revise everything. Even when the water is coming up to your neck, be ethic: never share a work that was given to you. If you won’t be able to do it, refuse it. Not knowing how to deal with dead-lines can be really bad for your image and it’s better to say that you can’t do it, then to accept and not deliver on time.

8 – Put some efforts into it. Sorry, a lot of efforts into it. To translate is not a “cheap job”. It is a professional like any other that requires a lot of efforts, dedication and improvement to do a great work and build a client list.

Still, there are a lot of other things that we have to learn, but those are the basic, according to the web site where the text came from as below.

Source of the text: http://www.terminologia.com.br/2011/09/dicas-ao-aspirante-a-tradutor/ (Yo, you found it!!!! AGAIN!!!)

Originally posted in 21/02/2014.

New Tips about a Good Translation

Hello, everybody!

Sorry for taking so long for another post, but I had a few things going on and didn’t have time to update.

Well, I am back and I will try to keep everything updated.

Once more, here I come with more tips about how to do a really good translation. Important to say, and I hope you also read this that the text IS NOT MINE. I just translated from a Portuguese Forum where Translators give each other tips about the work. Also, at the end of every post I make sure to include the SOURCE of the text if anyone wants to check it.

Hope you guys make good use of the tips. This first part of the tips are from a Forum where a guy – named Moicano – give some of the things that he use and used during his life experience. Also, those are specifically tips for Game Translation.

1 – Always read carefully the info on the topic of the project, this is the place the administrator will post how he wants the translation, dates of delivery of the files and other rules. Also, before you start translating, you have to know how you will translate, because the file format of the games changes from one to another.

2 – The best program to translate is Notepad ++ (Author’s note: Agreed. I personally use this one). Whit it, is possible to work will all kind of files and it’s Free! Still, you can use the one of your own preference.

3 – If it’s possible, try to use both languages. Most of the translations are made with English as based language and Spanish as support. And knowing how to use these both idioms can make the difference on the time of the translation. […] (Author’s note: This is an article focus the Brazilian people. However, you can adapt to your language as much as you need. Try to find another language similar to yours (if possible) to help with the translation.)

4 – DO NOT translate every word. This is a common mistake that all the translations made when thinking that they have to translate everything. In a good translation, the author creates ways to adapt the text and the information. You have to remember that the translation is being done for the people that speak your language, so nothing better than a good interpretation of the text and dialogs.

5 – ALWAYS use a Spelling and Grammar tool. Most of the time, it correct punctuation and other things and that can make the difference, if you spend a few minutes correcting and reading again what you’ve done.

6 – Ask for help. Post your questions on Forums and discussions sites. Do not stay stuck alone translating things. Nothing better than share the knowledge and learn a little more every day. You can also help some other translator to finish they work faster as they can do with you.

7 – Use dictionaries, translators, wikis as below:

Bab.la – Great dictionary, translate into many languages, explain all the possible translations of the word, give examples on how we can use the words, etc.

Urbandictionary – American Slang’s dictionary. It is also important to underline that American slangs has now translation to Portuguese. So there is where UD comes in handy. As a translation, you can read, understand and translate to Portuguese (Or any other language that you are working with). Also is a good one to search for the synonymous words of what you are looking for.

Wikia – Wiki Gamer, a complete wiki of games where you can find a lot of information about (GUESS) GAMES! Also, it is really important to use it because many games have their own terms when talking about guns, items, objects. So you can’t just translate it. (Author’s note: I also posted another text about that here on the blog).

WordReference – Besides being a good translator, what it’s important to underline is that it helps you with synonymous, definitions and other in Portuguese and Spanish. This can come in handy when you’re checking a sentence that doesn’t really fits the game of the situation.

When, so far that’s it. Once more, the text is NOT MINE and I am just spreading knowledge to other. Also, you can adapt to your own work and language. There is no rule on how the translation should be done. Still, you can follow some of them to help you out at work.

Hugs and hope to see you guys here more often.

Originally posted in 20/02/2014.

New Tips about a Good Translation

Hello, everybody!

Sorry for taking so long for another post, but I had a few things going on and didn’t have time to update.

Well, I am back and I will try to keep everything updated.

Once more, here I come with more tips about how to do a really good translation. Important to say, and I hope you also read this that the text IS NOT MINE. I just translated from a Portuguese Forum where Translators give each other tips about the work. Also, at the end of every post I make sure to include the SOURCE of the text if anyone wants to check it.

Hope you guys make good use of the tips. This first part of the tips are from a Forum where a guy – named Moicano – give some of the things that he use and used during his life experience. Also, those are specifically tips for Game Translation.

1 – Always read carefully the info on the topic of the project, this is the place the administrator will post how he wants the translation, dates of delivery of the files and other rules. Also, before you start translating, you have to know how you will translate, because the file format of the games changes from one to another.

2 – The best program to translate is Notepad ++ (Author’s note: Agreed. I personally use this one). Whit it, is possible to work will all kind of files and it’s Free! Still, you can use the one of your own preference.

3 – If it’s possible, try to use both languages. Most of the translations are made with English as based language and Spanish as support. And knowing how to use these both idioms can make the difference on the time of the translation. […] (Author’s note: This is an article focus the Brazilian people. However, you can adapt to your language as much as you need. Try to find another language similar to yours (if possible) to help with the translation.)

4 – DO NOT translate every word. This is a common mistake that all the translations made when thinking that they have to translate everything. In a good translation, the author creates ways to adapt the text and the information. You have to remember that the translation is being done for the people that speak your language, so nothing better than a good interpretation of the text and dialogs.

5 – ALWAYS use a Spelling and Grammar tool. Most of the time, it correct punctuation and other things and that can make the difference, if you spend a few minutes correcting and reading again what you’ve done.

6 – Ask for help. Post your questions on Forums and discussions sites. Do not stay stuck alone translating things. Nothing better than share the knowledge and learn a little more every day. You can also help some other translator to finish they work faster as they can do with you.

7 – Use dictionaries, translators, wikis as below:

Bab.la – Great dictionary, translate into many languages, explain all the possible translations of the word, give examples on how we can use the words, etc.

Urbandictionary – American Slang’s dictionary. It is also important to underline that American slangs has now translation to Portuguese. So there is where UD comes in handy. As a translation, you can read, understand and translate to Portuguese (Or any other language that you are working with). Also is a good one to search for the synonymous words of what you are looking for.

Wikia – Wiki Gamer, a complete wiki of games where you can find a lot of information about (GUESS) GAMES! Also, it is really important to use it because many games have their own terms when talking about guns, items, objects. So you can’t just translate it. (Author’s note: I also posted another text about that here on the blog).

WordReference – Besides being a good translator, what it’s important to underline is that it helps you with synonymous, definitions and other in Portuguese and Spanish. This can come in handy when you’re checking a sentence that doesn’t really fits the game of the situation.

When, so far that’s it. Once more, the text is NOT MINE and I am just spreading knowledge to other. Also, everything that you read here, you can adapt to your own work and language. There is no rule on how the translation should be done. Still, you can follow some of them to help you out at work.

Hugs and hope to see you guys here more often.

Worst Translations on the Game History

We all like to play a game on our own language. It helps with quests, understanding the game, the plot, the story behind everything, etc. But what happened when the developers/publishers hires poor translators? Or maybe, they are in such a rush to release the game that “a few” mistakes follow it until the release?

Well, games mostly came from Asia, Europe and North America and I’ve started seeing some games in Portuguese-Brazil, which is pretty amazing! I have no problems reading and understanding English (yet my blog may have a lot of misspellings and grammar error… sorry) I can play an English video game with no problems. Not Japanese. No. This one is out of the questions. All those little sticks around the screen…. naaa).

Now, let me tell you a good example of localization and translation. WORLD OF WARCRAFT, from Blizzard. I’ve always been a lover of that game and, when that started 10 years ago I was one of the firsts to play and created a character. That time the game had just a few places to explore and it was all in English. Choosing a class, race, weapons, quests, talking to people. I also have to thanks Blizzard because they kind of helped me with my English. 🙂

However, for other reasons, I had to stop playing. No more. Moved from my city, got a job, had to by a better computer, no money, lots of work – in a short – had to grow up. Recently, about 3 or 4 months ago I decided that I could go back and play again. Some of my friends were in there, talking about all the updates, news enemies, places, quests and biggest of all THE GAME WAS IN PORTUGUESE. First thing that came to me. That’s impossible. Translated to Portuguese? That’s probably a mess. No way they are going to be able to translate it. I was wrong.

For the first hours playing I found a little weird, after all I was used to English. After playing for a few days, I was convinced that they did a pretty good translation and not just that. They did localized amazingly well. There are somethings that deals directly with the Brazilian culture and I thought that was considering interesting. Not only caught my attention, but my feeling to keep playing and discover more things about it. Explore it more and more.

In a nut shell, you guys understand what a great translation and localization does with the player when it is well done? If I felt that way, imagine the millions of players in Brazil.

NOW, what would happen if the opposite? A bad translation/localization? Or a rush one? Even with great games that you loved in Japanese, but the English version went down the sink. You can check below.

10. FATAL FURY SPECIAL

Fatal Fury may be one of the games with most translations problems. I found a lot of them over the internet and its a huge example of rush release.

“Your fists of evil are about meet my steel wall of niceness”

Okay. What is wrong with this one? As far as I can understand, the grammar is missing a “to” so far. But, wait “wall of niceness”? Is that really a word that we use? Even if you won a battle and want to put the enemy down. Beware of my WALL OF NICENESS. Come on…..

9. GHOST N’ GOBLINS

“This story is happy end”

Beside this game be EXTREMELY difficult and you have to play it with no power bar and two lifes (but unlimited continues) and also have to beat it two times for the “real” ending, it is a really nice one. Now, This Story is a Happy End really made me think… a lot…. and after that you may also find “being the wise and courageour knight that you are you feel strongth welling in your body. Return to starting point challenge again.” Not my mistakes, just copy…..

8. GHOSTBUSTERS

Hey, it is really a great game (besides I’ve to hear the same song THE HOLE GAME) and I am glad I’ve completed (FINALLY). I also proved (NOT PROOVED) the justice of our culture and lets go and rest our heroes. This is fin….. OH WAIT. WHAT? Conglaturation? Really? What was that? Guess someone is missing the R feeling….

7. METAL GEAR

Another great game with some great sequels, but some problems with the English language. What do you feel asleep? Legs? Arms? hands? Its an old game and good to see that they learned their lesson (not on this one). You can also find things like “The truck have started to move” and “Attempt to contact missing our Grey fox”. Nowadays, the problem is just the explanations are hard to understand. Simple.

6. THE LEGEND OF ZELDA II

All right. You may be the first one of many errors. One of the programmers errors or just a misspelling ? Some people would say that this character was supposed to be called Ellor or Elrol or Errol or whatever but, as some oriental are pretty good in English, some how it just came as Error. Hi, my name is Error. Pretty weird….

5. DOUBLE DRAGON III

Another amazing game that I’ve played for hours when I was young. Had to buy for my consoles and play with my friends. However I am not quite sure about Jimmys partner. BIMMY. Weird enough, do you know anyone named Bimmy? Unless you know some Jimmy and may call him a little bit sick…. Bimmy? Maybe? naaa…..

4. FINAL FANTASY IV

Spoony bard? Really? You want to threat me with that? Oh, my! I am sorry to come into your humble house. Anyway, this is know wrong, talking about spelling, its just weird…

3. X-MEN: THE ARCADE GAME

“WELCOME TO DIE”

This is not actually on the text, but he says that. Really. I had to go after the video to check it myself. Couldn’t they think on anything more interesting to say? What the hell, spell doesn’t apply for the master of magnet.

2. PRO WRESTLING

Oh, thank you. a Winner is me! I feel like being taught by Yoda or something….

1. ZERO WING

After watching a few videos, I have to admit, almost every line is a pearl. He is about to kill and destroy everyone and has time to say “how are you gentlemen?” really? and “all your base are belong to us.” and “someone set us the bomb” and that goes on and on. Please…..

CONCLUSION

I could go over and over talking about it. I found so many information over bad English translations on video games that I’ll probably do more posts about it.

However, the reason of this post is to show how important is the spelling on a game. It doesn’t matter if the game is good (yes it does) but a bad spelling can ruin everything. Imagine it World of Warcraft had such problems like that? It would turn into a joke instead of a great and amazing game. I know that also my blog and the way I speak are not free or error (besides English be my second language) but even in Portuguese, where I studied for my whole life and went to two universities, I still make mistakes.

The point is, back at that time, they didn’t have what we have today. Ways to communicate. Tools to search, correct and fix. We have the internet for it. Is there, you just have to click it. Unfortunately, eve with that, we found some problems on the recent games. Not quite as before, but they are there. Do not believe me? Check this out that I found.

BONUS ROUND

People in Brazil tent to translate a few games that they like, just for fun or to help another to understand the game and spread their work. However, they tend to use the internet the wrong way. Not searching like it should or just using Google Translator to do the job. You can’t rely on a machine to do your job and translation and localization deals directly with the way a culture works and how you will introduce that to them. A machine can’t do that (as far as I know…).

So, lets check it out and I’ll try to translate from Portuguese to English so you can “see” what I “see”.

This one is simple asking is she is weak on sex, like, “And me? Am I weak in sex?” Guess they try to if she is the week sex…
I was trying to understand what the heck my comrades were trying to do here. For you guys to understand, it says “Why don’t you let me take care of your butt so I can leave the environment more…” you get the idea. Using your imagination, I believe he tried to translated from the English:  “Why don’t you let me watch your back…”

And this is little bit porn, so please, do not sue me for that. Simple, its says “Stop cumming on my face, Mai”. I guess it was stop mocking me or stop making fun of me, but we (Brazilians translators) did a really good work and that’s the result. Google Translator is the one.

So, that’s it. I hope I have time to work on other posts like that.

Translation and Localisation Work – Alien Shooter Vengeance

Good Evening, everyone!

UPDATE: Pretty amazing what you can do after play the game one more time missing the old days. I found out a few more mistakes and correct them at the game – not in the pictures. So you may not look for Portuguese mistakes in it… please… 🙂

I should have posted this a long time ago. For those who search over the internet, you may find the translated patches for this game, but I wanted to do the work myself and make sure that everything is on it place, audio and texts, credits, weapons, character, etc. etc. etc.

For the ones who doesn’t know, Alien Shooter: Vengeance – also known as Alien Shooter 2 – is a game developed by Sigma Team (which I have e-mail it to tell them about my work and translation, but had no replies….). It is a surviving terror/action game that mix aliens, weapons, shooting, arcade game and a lot of blood and things blowing.

You are a mercenary that M.A.G.M.A. Energy Corp. sends to a top secret object. A lot of weird and dangerous experiences were held where you are and now, after all that, everything is out of control. You must find you way in, complete a series of tasks and destroy anything and anyone in your path. Pretty nice if you want a game where you can shoot more and think less. More about the game, you can google it. I am here to talk about my work. J

It took my about 2 weeks, as far as I can remember, to complete the game between editing all the menus, texts, files, saves, objects, levels, etc. and for testing all the translations, box sizes, audio and writing. I worked in it every day after work – about 1 hours – and every day after my university, 1 to 2 hours to finish it. Most of the problems that I had was checking the audio and make sure that everything was correct – as the English speech was ok with the Portuguese text. I couldn’t translate the audio due to the lack of “technology”. (I did it at home, come on…)

Below you can check a few pictures of it.

I did most of the game translation. However it is kind of hard to translate things that are “normal” to brazilians and others that we are used to in English.

Even in English, most of the speeches were different from the wroten text. On the translation I did care about that because if you speak a good English, you may get confuse about what is being said and what you are reading.

Another thing that you may have to care is about the slangs and jokes. Those may have a lot of sense in English, but when translating you have to check which is your aim public and culture. Not all the translation has to be “perfect and asymmetric”.

Messange log and all the other texts were translated understading the way of thinking of each character. An alien, for example, may not speak as the same fluent way as a human…. in some cases….

Because of the space, you sometimes have to change one word to another completaly different, keeping the same meaning to fit it into the designed space.
Another thing is that a lot of English works don’t have thinks like Ç or ^ or ~. So you may have to check with the programmers how you are going to solve that out…
And most important, we have to credit it for our work. 🙂

Thank you for reading my post!
IMPORTANT: I would like to underline that I am NOT taking any profit with this translation and I did NOT send to anyone. This is just to show my work as a translator/localisator and this version of the game is not available for downloading. You may buy the original one and download a patch from the internet to translate it, which is not hard to find.
All the game, info, programming, design, characters, and more (except the translation) are property of SIGMA TEAM and I did not create the game or anything else.
Drive safe!

Part II – Tips for a Good Translation

Hi.
There I am again with second part of the Tips for a good translation. Once more, these are information that I found over the internet and if you want to check the real source, please IT IS ON THE POST. Read all of it. If after reading once, you couldn’t find the source, READ IT AGAIN! Then if you couldn’t, again, find the source, make sure that you really could find it and send me and e-mail that I will personally (as being the only one working on the blog right now) include it. J

Translation and adaptation to English: Blog’s Author. Enjoy the reading!
1 – Do the right thing. To understand a pair of languages is indispensable, but NOT enough. All the languages have its own particularities, idiomatic expressions, etc. e.g. a good translator is not the one that translates everything word by word, but the ones that knows how to understand the info and express it correctly on the target idiom;

2 –Research A LOT. Search about the text and work you are doing, so you can understand of what you are writing about. Invest as long as it necessary, because that will give you more confidence and agility when working;

3 – NEVER GUESS. When you get to a point where you have to translate something that has many meanings, make a “cross comparison” of the term’s definition on the main language and target language. Compare them until you find a better translation that fits on your work;

4 – Update yourself. Get into Forums about translation. It is a good way to count with others experience and still be updated with what is going on in the market.

5 – Use, but do not abused the internet. Search engines, as Google, are really helpful when talking about translations. But never trust on the “superficial look” or, “just a quick look” to check something. Go after many sources before deciding to use a term. It doesn’t matter that a term back with 1 million accesses of views, it still can be wrong.

6 – Lear how use a computer. This is your main object of work. Do not stay just on writing texts and using Word. Get into the internet, write e-mails, connect yourself, discover. There are a lot of information (useful ones) if you know where to look and how to do a search;

7 – Be ethical and professional. Read all the text and analyses before accepting the job. Calculate how long you will take to research about the subject, translate and revise everything. Even when the water is coming up to your neck, be ethic: never share a work that was given to you. If you won’t be able to do it, refuse it. Not knowing how to deal with dead-lines can be really bad for your image and it’s better to say that you can’t do it, then to accept and not deliver on time.

8 – Put some efforts into it. Sorry, a lot of efforts into it. To translate is not a “cheap job”. It is a professional like any other that requires a lot of efforts, dedication and improvement to do a great work and build a client list.

Still, there are a lot of other things that we have to learn, but those are the basic, according to the web site where the text came from as below.

Source of the text: http://www.terminologia.com.br/2011/09/dicas-ao-aspirante-a-tradutor/(Yo, you found it!!!! AGAIN!!!) J

New Tips about a Good Translation

Hello, everybody!

Sorry for taking so long for another post, but I had a few things going on and didn’t have time to update.

Well, I am back and I will try to keep everything updated.
Once more, here I come with more tips about how to do a really good translation. Important to say, and I hope you also read this that the text IS NOT MINE. I just translated from a Portuguese Forum where Translators give each other tips about the work. Also, at the end of every post I make sure to include the SOURCE of the text if anyone wants to check it.
Hope you guys make good use of the tips. This first part of the tips are from a Forum where a guy – named Moicano – give some of the things that he use and used during his life experience. Also, those are specifically tips for Game Translation.
1 – Always read carefully the info on the topic of the project, this is the place the administrator will post how he wants the translation, dates of delivery of the files and other rules. Also, before you start translating, you have to know how you will translate, because the file format of the games changes from one to another.

2 – The best program to translate is Notepad ++ (Author’s note: Agreed. I personally use this one). Whit it, is possible to work will all kind of files and it’s Free! Still, you can use the one of your own preference.

3 – If it’s possible, try to use both languages. Most of the translations are made with English as based language and Spanish as support. And knowing how to use these both idioms can make the difference on the time of the translation. […] (Author’s note: This is an article focus the Brazilian people. However, you can adapt to your language as much as you need. Try to find another language similar to yours (if possible) to help with the translation.)

4 – DO NOT translate every word. This is a common mistake that all the translations made when thinking that they have to translate everything. In a good translation, the author creates ways to adapt the text and the information. You have to remember that the translation is being done for the people that speak your language, so nothing better than a good interpretation of the text and dialogs.

5 – ALWAYS use a Spelling and Grammar tool. Most of the time, it correct punctuation and other things and that can make the difference, if you spend a few minutes correcting and reading again what you’ve done.

6 – Ask for help. Post your questions on Forums and discussions sites. Do not stay stuck alone translating things. Nothing better than share the knowledge and learn a little more every day. You can also help some other translator to finish they work faster as they can do with you.

7 – Use dictionaries, translators, wikis as below:

Bab.la – Great dictionary, translate into many languages, explain all the possible translations of the word, give examples on how we can use the words, etc.

Urbandictionary – American Slang’s dictionary. It is also important to underline that American slangs has now translation to Portuguese. So there is where UD comes in handy. As a translation, you can read, understand and translate to Portuguese (Or any other language that you are working with). Also is a good one to search for the synonymous words of what you are looking for.

Wikia – Wiki Gamer, a complete wiki of games where you can find a lot of information about (GUESS) GAMES! Also, it is really important to use it because many games have their own terms when talking about guns, items, objects. So you can’t just translate it. (Author’s note: I also posted another text about that here on the blog).

WordReference – Besides being a good translator, what it’s important to underline is that it helps you with synonymous, definitions and other in Portuguese and Spanish. This can come in handy when you’re checking a sentence that doesn’t really fits the game of the situation.
When, so far that’s it. Once more, the text is NOT MINE and I am just spreading knowledge to other. Also, everything that you read here, you can adapt to your own work and language. There is no rule on how the translation should be done. Still, you can follow some of them to help you out at work.

Hugs and hope to see you guys here more often.

Translation and Localization in Brazil


Hi!
Talking about Localization, we saw that this is the process of adapting the language, appearance, and functionality of a product to the public in a specific country. There are many things to take care of and this professional has to be aware of the culture and more.

Deeper into this subject, we have the Brazilian Portuguese Localization. No different from what I said before, but aiming the Brazilian public. Our biggest problem here, and the complains of many people that I talk to, are the movies. Dubbed movies are, most of the time, horrible to watch and make a lot of ears bleed if you know how to speak English. Of course not all the Brazilians can learn English – or another language – and watch the movie with the original sound, but, if they only knew what happens, they may agree with me.
Well, one example is the translation of movie titles. Let work with a really nice movie that I liked a lot because of the sound tracks – Tenacious D and the Pick of Destiny. In Portuguese, the translation of that is “Tenacious D – Uma Dupla Infernal” (In Portugal is it call – Rock dos Infernos – En: Rock from Hell). So, let supposed that the movie was released in Brazil and we had to translate to English. The name would be “Tenacious D – An Infernal Double” or “An Infernal Couple”, something like that. Wouldn’t that sound pretty weird?

Now, assuming that the movie is about 2 guys that are looking for a magic guitar pic, why wouldn’t translate the title to “Tenacious D – A palheta do Destino” (Original English name: Tenacious D and the Pick of Destiny).
Well, that’s because that wouldn’t be so good as “Uma dupla Infernal”. If you research and check the movies here in Brazil, most of it has really different names and that is because of Localization.
I started to understand why they give such names to the movies that would sound so good also in Portuguese. Brazilian people are not used to these kinds of names and, to reach most of the population, they have to call that. According to the online newspaper ultimosegundo.ig.com.br, only 2% of the Brazilian population knows how to speak fluent English. Then imagine you releasing a movie here In Brazil with the original title. And more, most of the Brazilian people are not used to the kind of music that is played on the movie. Hard/Heavy music are some styles really hard to get into the Brazilian culture. So, that’s why – and for other reasons – that they had to change the name.
I have to say that really makes me feel bad, because, when talking about music, it is a pretty good movie, but I have to agree that it wouldn’t reach so many people with the original title translated.
There is where we come with the localization. Not only on the movies, but in games. If you do not do a really good job, not only translating but localizing, something in the game will be out of tune for the Brazilian public and it make take you game – which can be amazing – to a disaster just because you didn`t do a good job.
Another think about it is how you translate and how you localize a specific game to a specific public. But I will try to talk about that in another post.